high quality Mindf*ck: new arrival Cambridge Analytica and discount the Plot to Break America outlet sale

high quality Mindf*ck: new arrival Cambridge Analytica and discount the Plot to Break America outlet sale

high quality Mindf*ck: new arrival Cambridge Analytica and discount the Plot to Break America outlet sale

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For the first time, the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower tells the inside story of the data mining and psychological manipulation behind the election of Donald Trump and the Brexit referendum, connecting Facebook, WikiLeaks, Russian intelligence, and international hackers.

Mindf*ck demonstrates how digital influence operations, when they converged with the nasty business of politics, managed to hollow out democracies.”—The Washington Post

Mindf*ck goes deep inside Cambridge Analytica’s “American operations,” which were driven by Steve Bannon’s vision to remake America and fueled by mysterious billionaire Robert Mercer’s money, as it weaponized and wielded the massive store of data it had harvested on individuals—in excess of 87 million—to disunite the United States and set Americans against each other. Bannon had long sensed that deep within America’s soul lurked an explosive tension. Cambridge Analytica had the data to prove it, and in 2016 Bannon had a presidential campaign to use as his proving ground.

Christopher Wylie might have seemed an unlikely figure to be at the center of such an operation. Canadian and liberal in his politics, he was only twenty-four when he got a job with a London firm that worked with the U.K. Ministry of Defense and was charged putatively with helping to build a team of data scientists to create new tools to identify and combat radical extremism online. In short order, those same military tools were turned to political purposes, and Cambridge Analytica was born.

Wylie’s decision to become a whistleblower prompted the largest data-crime investigation in history. His story is both exposé and dire warning about a sudden problem born of very new and powerful capabilities. It has not only laid bare the profound vulnerabilities—and profound carelessness—in the enormous companies that drive the attention economy, it has also exposed the profound vulnerabilities of democracy itself. What happened in 2016 was just a trial run. Ruthless actors are coming for your data, and they want to control what you think.

Review

“Wylie covers plenty of ground, explaining in illuminating and often scary detail how Cambridge Analytica exploited the data to create Facebook pages that would needle ‘neurotic, conspiratorial citizens,’ propagating an outraged solidarity.” The New York Times

Mindf*ck is worth reading if you''re interested in some of the bigger questions of the day: elections; data; Russia’s involvement in all of this; Steve Bannon''s power plays in global politics; the list of politicians who make an appearance at the Cambridge Analytica offices. . . . The book does serve as a reminder that it might be time to check in with yourself and your relationship with the internet. Wylie talks about invading America by ‘purposefully activating the worst in people, from paranoia to racism.’ Especially in relation to a certain company that sees regulation of its industry as an ‘existential threat,’ it’s a nice time to really wonder—sure, online feels good. But is it worth it?” —NPR

Mindf*ck demonstrates how digital influence operations, when they converged with the nasty business of politics, managed to hollow out democracies. . . . [Wylie’s] personal story, woven into the book’s narrative, illustrates the confusion of our current political era as well as the challenge to Wylie’s fellow members of the social media generation as they seek identities real and imagined, physical and virtual. . . . He makes clear how important the virtual world is to personal identity for his generation and those that follow.” The Washington Post

About the Author

Christopher Wylie has been called “the millennials’ first great whistleblower” and “a pink-haired, nose-ringed oracle sent from the future.” He is known for his role in setting up—and then taking down—Cambridge Analytica. His revelations exposing the rampant misuse of data rocked Silicon Valley and led to some of the largest multinational investigations into data crime ever. Born in British Columbia, Canada, he studied law at the London School of Economics before moving into cultural data science and fashion trend forecasting. He lives in London, England.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

Genesis

With each step, my new shoes dig into my heels. I clutch a dark-blue binder, filled with documents organized by colored tabs. Awestruck by where I’ve found myself, and apprehensive of where I’m heading, I focus on the sounds of our footsteps. An aide reminds us to move quickly so we won’t be seen. We walk past uniformed guards, into an atrium, and turn down a corridor. The aide pushes open a door and we rush down some stairs and into a hallway that looks exactly like the last one—marble floors, high ceilings, wooden doors with the occasional American flag. There are seven of us, and our footsteps echo through the hall. We are close; then I’m caught. A congressman spots me and waves hello. Back again already? A handful of journalists wanders out of a press conference. They clock my electric pink hair and know who I am.

Two cameramen run in front of me and start filming, walking backward as they do. A scrum forms, the questions start coming— Mr. Wylie, a question from NBC! A question from CNN! Why are you here?—and one of my lawyers reminds me to keep my mouth shut. The aide points me to an elevator, warning the journalists to keep their distance, and we pile in. The cameras keep snapping as the doors close.

I’m jammed in the back of the elevator, surrounded by people in suits. We start to descend, dropping deep underground. Everyone stays quiet on the way down. My mind is swimming with all of the prep work I’ve done with my lawyers—what U.S. laws were broken and by whom, what rights I do and don’t have as a non-citizen visiting America, how to calmly respond to accusations, what happens if I am arrested afterward. I have no idea what to expect. No one does.

We come to a stop and the elevator doors glide open. There’s nothing down here except another door, with a large red sign that reads RESTRICTED AREA in white lettering. NO PUBLIC OR MEDIA ACCESS. We’re three floors beneath the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, D.C.

Beyond the door, the floors are covered in a plush maroon carpet. Uniformed guards confiscate our phones and other electronics, placing them on a numbered shelf behind the desk, one to a person, and giving us each a numbered ticket. They tell us we can have only pencils and paper beyond this point. And on the way out, they warn us, our papers could be confiscated if it’s determined that we’ve taken notes on anything of a sensitive nature.

Two guards push open a massive steel door. One of them gestures us through, and one by one we step into a long hallway dimly illuminated by fluorescent lights. The walls are paneled in dark wood, and the corridor is lined with long rows of American flags on stands. It smells like an old building, stale and musty, with hints of cleaning fluid. The guards lead us down the hall, turning left and continuing to yet another door. Above, a wooden seal emblazoned with a giant eagle, arrows clutched in its talons, stares down at us. We have arrived at our destination: the Sensitive Compartmentalized Information Facility (SCIF) of the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence—the same room where classified congressional briefings are held.

Inside, hit by the glare of fluorescent lights, my eyes need time to adjust. The space is thoroughly nondescript, with blank beige walls and a conference table surrounded by chairs. It could be any room in any of the numerous bland federal buildings scattered across Washington, but I’m struck by the silence of the SCIF. It is soundproof, built with multilayer walls that make it impervious to surveillance. The architecture is said to be blast-proof. This is a secure space, a place for America’s secrets.

Once we’ve taken our seats, the members of Congress begin filing in. Aides place tabulated binders on the table in front of each committee member—the Democrats’ ranking member, California congressman Adam Schiff, sits directly across from me, and to his left sits Congresswoman Terri Sewell, with Eric Swalwell and Joaquin Castro clustered together at the far end. I’m flanked by my lawyers and my friend Shahmir Sanni, a fellow whistleblower. We give the Republicans a few minutes to show up. They never do.

It’s June 2018, and I’m in Washington to testify to the U.S. Congress about Cambridge Analytica, a military contractor and psychological warfare firm where I used to work, and a complex web involving Facebook, Russia, WikiLeaks, the Trump campaign, and the Brexit referendum. As the former director of research, I’ve brought with me evidence of how Facebook’s data was weaponized by the firm, and how the systems they built left millions of Americans vulnerable to the propaganda operations of hostile foreign states. Schiff leads the questioning. A former federal prosecutor, he is sharp and precise with his lines of inquiry, and he wastes no time getting to the heart of the matter.

Did you work with Steve Bannon? Yes.
Did Cambridge Analytica have any contacts with potential Russian agents? Yes.
Do you believe that this data was used to sway the American electorate to elect the president of the United States? Yes.

An hour goes by, then two, then three. I chose to come here of my own accord and to answer these questions about how a liberal, gay twenty-four-year-old Canadian found himself part of a British military contractor developing psychological warfare tools for the American alt-right. Fresh out of university, I had taken a job at a London firm called SCL Group, which was supplying the U.K. Ministry of Defence and NATO armies with expertise in information operations. After Western militaries were grappling with how to tackle radicalization online, the firm wanted me to help build a team of data scientists to create new tools to identify and combat extremism online. It was fascinating, challenging, and exciting all at once. We were about to break new ground for the cyber defenses of Britain, America, and their allies and confront bubbling insurgencies of radical extremism with data, algorithms, and targeted narratives online. But through a chain of events that unfolded in 2014, a billionaire acquired our project in order to build his own radicalized insurgency in America. Cambridge Analytica, a company few had ever heard of, a company that weaponized research in psychological profiling, managed to turn the world upside down.

In the military, when weapons fall into the wrong hands, they call it blowback. It looked as if this blowback had detonated in the White House itself. I could not continue working on something so corrosive to our societies, so I blew the whistle, reported the whole thing to the authorities, and worked with journalists to warn the public about what was going on. Sitting before this panel, jet-lagged from a transatlantic flight the day before, I still cannot help but feel on the spot as the questions grow more pointed. But several times, my attempts to explain the intricacies of the company’s operations leave everyone with puzzled faces, so I simply pull out a binder and slide it to the congressmen. What the hell, I think. I’ve come this far, so I might as well give them everything I have with me. There is no break, and the door behind me remains closed the entire time. I’m locked in a stuffy, windowless room deep underground, with nowhere to look except straight into the eyes of these members of Congress as they all try to figure out what the hell just happened to their country.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Christine
5.0 out of 5 stars
engaging narrative and disappointing real world
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019
Whistleblowers are heroes. Written in an engaging narrative with shocking detail and disappointing real world results. What have we done to change the risk for 2020? Very little.
85 people found this helpful
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John J. Lentini
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Be afraid. Be very afraid.
Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2019
This book should be required reading for all Facebook users. What started out as a company working to prevent radicalization of jihadists, and fight narcotrafficking, Steve Bannon turned into a company to radicalize people who felt oppressed by"political correctness." The... See more
This book should be required reading for all Facebook users. What started out as a company working to prevent radicalization of jihadists, and fight narcotrafficking, Steve Bannon turned into a company to radicalize people who felt oppressed by"political correctness." The author states, "In the end, we were creating a machine to contaminate America with hate and cultish paranoia ..." Cambridge Analytica is gone, but guess where much of the executive team is working now. If you guessed Trump 2020, you would be correct. Be afraid. Be very afraid.
46 people found this helpful
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MacDuff
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
More detail would be good
Reviewed in the United States on October 21, 2019
This is an interesting book to read, particularly with regard to antiquated approaches to reaching potential voters with persuasive messages, and the newer targeted delivery of tailored communications. As a social scientist myself, I find the book lacking in terms of... See more
This is an interesting book to read, particularly with regard to antiquated approaches to reaching potential voters with persuasive messages, and the newer targeted delivery of tailored communications. As a social scientist myself, I find the book lacking in terms of providing references for fact-checking purposes. We basically simply have to take it for granted that the author is accurate in all descriptions. While this might make sense when you describe conversations or meetings (who would want to fact-check the hand cream next to Bannon''s nightstand, after all?), but when it comes to descriptions of research or outcome assessments, I''d really like to see more citations (or any citations for that matter). I can see that Wylie is knowledgeable in social science literature in cognitive psych, for example, since he describes studies I know very well, but other times he describes things that I would very much like to have linked to a source reference or any other way for me to look it up. I still give the book 5 stars in spite of this weakness. Wylie, if you read this, I''d love for you to be more up-front on outcome assessment - I simply can''t tell how strong is this targeted persuasion effect. Numbers, I want numbers. I guess it all balances out. Heavily footnoted stuff can be hard for most people to read, so perhaps this book was tailored to your anticipated audience, which is fair.
32 people found this helpful
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Steve Telleen
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is a must read
Reviewed in the United States on October 13, 2019
This well-written autobiography reads like a spy thriller. If you didn''t know the characters and events from the news you might think it was dystopian fiction. Anyone who is curious about the detailed connections behind Brexit, Trump, the Alt-Right, Fake-News, Facebook, and... See more
This well-written autobiography reads like a spy thriller. If you didn''t know the characters and events from the news you might think it was dystopian fiction. Anyone who is curious about the detailed connections behind Brexit, Trump, the Alt-Right, Fake-News, Facebook, and how your privacy has been weaponized needs to read this. The book is also a "coming of age" story about a naive computer geek''s journey through temptation, hell, and redemption at the highest levels of wealth and power. I hope someone makes this into a movie...soon.
37 people found this helpful
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Ham Ward
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is SO important on SO many levels!
Reviewed in the United States on October 17, 2019
Timely and important book. Cogent, informative, and impactful. Read it in two days. Fun, well written and with just the right amount of snark in it. This book must have hit home as you can see the bad guys already trying to smear author Wylie in the media and other... See more
Timely and important book. Cogent, informative, and impactful. Read it in two days. Fun, well written and with just the right amount of snark in it. This book must have hit home as you can see the bad guys already trying to smear author Wylie in the media and other venues.

Highly recommended if you want to understand where we were two years ago and where we are now headed in terms of cyberwarfare, computational psych, the future of democracy and privacy (or lack thereof), AI and many more topics.

Good discussion about the dark side of social media. Companies that act like a nation-state with no competition with no oversight.

Wylie comes across as interesting and likeable. An intelligent character who is candid about his shortcomings and the monster he helped create with a real grasp of the wider issues.

liked that Wylie devotes the last section of the MF book to intelligent and well thought out regulatory approaches to counter the negatives infecting the Internet.
18 people found this helpful
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Pliny
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Devastating news for democracy
Reviewed in the United States on November 9, 2019
This is a real life tale with devastating relevance to our country and the world''s future. With the energy of youth, an intense interest in human politics and psychology, and being of the generation knowing how to use computers and the internet to accomplish real-world... See more
This is a real life tale with devastating relevance to our country and the world''s future. With the energy of youth, an intense interest in human politics and psychology, and being of the generation knowing how to use computers and the internet to accomplish real-world change, Christopher Wylie slipped down a very dark path. How many of us can honestly say that while finding our way early in our careers, we wound up making decisions which directly altered the course of history -- giving the "edge" to Brexit and the US 2016 election outcome. Wylie, this young Canadian did. Ultimately, testifying before Congress and in writing this book, he became a whistleblower on himself and Cambridge Analytica.

Consider the potential impact of this discovery: In Wylie''s psychological research, he found that a relatively small number of social media "likes" were enough to very clearly categorize the political and social characteristics of a person. He points out that discovering just 10 "likes" identified the person better than his/her co-workers, 150 "likes'' better than a family member, and 300 "likes" better than one''s spouse.

As retired software engineers (and not social media users), my wife and I, having just completed reading the book over a couple weeks, found this to be compelling, but not easy reading. It is eye-opening to discover how "every click we make" while browsing the internet isn''t just innocently stored so people can sell us more stuff. With little work, these "clicks" are associated with a privately owned computer record on each of us. Enterprises like CA connect all the details they can to each personal record -- names, aliases, emails, contacts, property ownership, voting records, race, income, credit stats, memberships, social & blog posts, purchases, product reviews, video watchlists, tweets, "likes", smart phone GPS locations, computer & smart TV IP addresses, and so on. Much of this data is public and free and much can be bought. Some can be hacked. So each of us is very well "known" and categorizable, by a growing industry of amoral, for-profit, non-governmental private enterprises. And we don''t get paid for our data or even have the right to know what they have on us.

So what? Well, with a small expenditure of money to buy data, let''s say your organization has gathered more than enough of this data on individual people stored in their database for all practical purposes, representing the US population "virtually" on a computer. Each individual record is filled out with detailed personality characteristics and psychological tendencies. In the database, you could search online social commentary looking for key words revealing what gets users angry or insecure. [As Wylie points out, anger pretty much destroys the human animal''s ability to think while in that state.] Next study these people in your database, see where they live, work, what they eat, what they believe in. Now you can test what psychological and political messages you might need to feed them to reinforce their behavior, keeping them angry or worried. If the test works, scale it up. Then work on another group, and so on.

Even this example is simple and unsophisticated, considering all the data you have. Maybe, childless, pet-less, married people who live in cities and watch violent movies are a special group who would respond to the appropriate micro-targeted message from your corporate or political client. You don''t even have to plan what you''re looking for -- it''s easy to let a computer program work on all your data, make the associations, and find all the possibilities.

The beauty and danger to democracy in micro-targeting is that when you deliver your messaging, the bulk of the population is unaware of the targeted messages you create, because you can target down to one person, ten, or a thousand at your whim. In the meantime, "likers" and "re-tweeters" happily amplify your message to like-minded targets. As a result, a politician or corporate leader could go up or down in popularity with neither the press nor the general public having any underlying clue of your targeting campaign.

It seems almost unbelievable that casual "liking" across the internet and social media would so dramatically threaten modern society, but here we are. For shortsighted convenience and instant ego reinforcement, we have freely provided our private preferences and life minutia for corporate and political databases whose owners now have the easy task of just refining and updating it periodically for their own ends. So it was inevitable, that with no meaningful governmental regulations to speak of, and with humanity''s insatiable demand for power and money, our widely available personal data would cleverly become used against us.

These are critical times for those who understood what Benjamin Franklin meant when he said we Americans have "a republic, if you can keep it." But that was long ago and largely forgotten. Now with business and political leaders re-discovering how useful public ignorance and distraction can be to retain power, they use their consultants to proactively divide us into angry, non-thinking, but convenient tribes. Yet somehow we still are told and collectively believe that America is just too “exceptional” to ever fail.
16 people found this helpful
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Ann Little
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I find these 5 star reviews suspect.
Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2019
I am trudging through the first few chapters hoping for the substance which so far shows little promise of occurring. Most of it so far is about how much smarter he is than everyone else and his love for goofy looks like colored hair and how people dress. I keep thinking he... See more
I am trudging through the first few chapters hoping for the substance which so far shows little promise of occurring. Most of it so far is about how much smarter he is than everyone else and his love for goofy looks like colored hair and how people dress. I keep thinking he has to get on with it at some point. If he does after the first few chapters get on with it I will be back for a positive review but at this point, the first few chapters could be cut without losing much.
13 people found this helpful
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Mitch
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
absolutely a must read
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2019
Wow - all the things i didn''t know and not happy to find out. A well written book that makes me realize i am just a bit of data - that some track more than you ever would realize. Recommended read so that you realize how your privacy is a myth - actually I think it should... See more
Wow - all the things i didn''t know and not happy to find out. A well written book that makes me realize i am just a bit of data - that some track more than you ever would realize. Recommended read so that you realize how your privacy is a myth - actually I think it should be required reading. Also explains a lot about my fellow voters that I hadn''t thought about. Wow.
12 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Erin Brooks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 6, 2019
Excellent well written book. Makes mad that more isn’t being done to address all the issues raised in this book.
Excellent well written book. Makes mad that more isn’t being done to address all the issues raised in this book.
One person found this helpful
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M Clark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The most important book on poltics published in 2019
Reviewed in Germany on November 26, 2019
This is easily one of the most important books on politics released in 2019. It tells the story of how the work of Cambridge Analytica helped influence the 2016 US elections as well as the Brexit Leave campaign. The company had an app that mined the Facebook data of tens of...See more
This is easily one of the most important books on politics released in 2019. It tells the story of how the work of Cambridge Analytica helped influence the 2016 US elections as well as the Brexit Leave campaign. The company had an app that mined the Facebook data of tens of millions of Facebook users and identified those that could best be targeted by messages designed to increase anger and divisiveness thereby driving those people to vote. The techniques used were those of psychological warfare and copied some of the techniques used by IS terrorists. The book was written by an insider who helped develop many of the programs at CA and who met with many of the key players involved in the 2016 election including Steve Bannon and the Mercers. When he realized what was going on, he left the company and became a whistleblower testifying to both the UK parliament and the US congress. Because of his revelations about Facebooks role in all of this, he was targeted by Facebook legally and was targeted with hate campaigns by members of the alt-right. Readers are left feeling his paranoia in a way that made the paranoia of Woodward and Bernstein look mild by comparison. Speaking of which, this book should be made into a film.
This is easily one of the most important books on politics released in 2019. It tells the story of how the work of Cambridge Analytica helped influence the 2016 US elections as well as the Brexit Leave campaign. The company had an app that mined the Facebook data of tens of millions of Facebook users and identified those that could best be targeted by messages designed to increase anger and divisiveness thereby driving those people to vote. The techniques used were those of psychological warfare and copied some of the techniques used by IS terrorists.

The book was written by an insider who helped develop many of the programs at CA and who met with many of the key players involved in the 2016 election including Steve Bannon and the Mercers. When he realized what was going on, he left the company and became a whistleblower testifying to both the UK parliament and the US congress. Because of his revelations about Facebooks role in all of this, he was targeted by Facebook legally and was targeted with hate campaigns by members of the alt-right. Readers are left feeling his paranoia in a way that made the paranoia of Woodward and Bernstein look mild by comparison. Speaking of which, this book should be made into a film.
3 people found this helpful
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Sahil Dawka
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Canadian author helps break American politics from the UK
Reviewed in Canada on December 8, 2019
This book is a must read for any person who cares about politics - our system for people to control people. It''s a first hand account of the birth of information warfare in the political arena, and details the despicable lengths that desensitized humans can go to.
This book is a must read for any person who cares about politics - our system for people to control people. It''s a first hand account of the birth of information warfare in the political arena, and details the despicable lengths that desensitized humans can go to.
4 people found this helpful
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Papamad
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No esta mal
Reviewed in Spain on March 25, 2020
No dejara una huella indeleble en mi, pero el libro no esta mal. A quien no conozca el tema de los big data le encantará, a quien sepa del caso, le iluminará algunos rincones, pero no le hará ver la luz. Distraido y revelador de como algo que puede usarse para ampliar el...See more
No dejara una huella indeleble en mi, pero el libro no esta mal. A quien no conozca el tema de los big data le encantará, a quien sepa del caso, le iluminará algunos rincones, pero no le hará ver la luz. Distraido y revelador de como algo que puede usarse para ampliar el conocimiento, también puede usarse para manipularlo. Despues de leerlo, uno queda aun mas escamado del uso que se puede hacer de los datos privados. Y ya es dificil que no los demos, si queremos estar conectados.
No dejara una huella indeleble en mi, pero el libro no esta mal. A quien no conozca el tema de los big data le encantará, a quien sepa del caso, le iluminará algunos rincones, pero no le hará ver la luz. Distraido y revelador de como algo que puede usarse para ampliar el conocimiento, también puede usarse para manipularlo.

Despues de leerlo, uno queda aun mas escamado del uso que se puede hacer de los datos privados. Y ya es dificil que no los demos, si queremos estar conectados.
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Colette
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not what was expected.
Reviewed in Canada on August 29, 2021
The container is a good size but the flap is difficult to open. If your hands are at all weak with arthritis this is not the product for you.
The container is a good size but the flap is difficult to open. If your hands are at all weak with arthritis this is not the product for you.
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